Gettin’ Boozy With Summer’s Most Graceful Glass: Rosé Wine

rosé wine

A few summers back, I spotted a bottle of rosé wine in our local supermarket, and I had my suspicions.

That bottle looked a lot like the face-puckering 80’s mom drink, white zinfandel — also known as ‘the gateway wine.’

But this new rosé wine craze has quickly become an actual ‘thing.’

And because white zin is a rosé, albeit a super-sweet, sugary, mass-produced version of it, it too is getting some of its popularity back (cringe).

Grab a custom-made wine glass from a local artist and a bottle of pink, and read on for the flavor profile, making of, buying of, pairing of, and info on the #brose movement.

The Fruity Flavor Profile

Source: Palmdenver/ Instagram

Just like any other wine, the type of grape will determine its flavors.

A dry rosé is what’s poppin’ these days.

  • Dry varieties are more likely to come from Europe, with some exceptions, of course.
  • Rosé wine has hints of strawberry, honeydew melon, rose petal, citrus zest, rhubarb, and raspberry, depending.
  • It is light, clean, and fresh. It can be fizzy or flat. Its quality blooms in palate.
  • The most common grapes used include: Grenache, Syrah, Pinot Noir, Sangiovese, Carignan, Cinsault, and Mourvedre; however Manhattan sommelier Grant Reynolds told GQ not to worry about the grape used because a lot of flavor is lost in the winemaking process. It’s more about the region and acidity.
  • They make great summer cocktails.
  • It’s refreshing, delicious, and entirely possible to drink an entire bottle in one sitting (a friend told me).

The Making of Rosé Wine

Nearly any red-wine grape can be used to make rosé, although some are preferred over others.

There are three methods to the winemaking process — maceration, Saignée, and the blending method.

Here’s the process of maceration simplified:

  • Red grapes are destemmed and juiced
  • The skins sit in the juice (macerate) for about 2-20 hours (the longer they sit, the darker the rosé)
  • The juice is strained from the skin mixture
  • Fermentation happens
  • Wine destabilizes
  • Rosé is bottled

The blending method mixes a bit of red wine in to add a richer color, but it’s very uncommon.

Source: winefolly.com

Buying Tips: Get Your Rosé On RN

Unlike red wine, rosé does not improve with age. So grab a bottle of last year’s vintage over one from 2015, and drink up the pinks in your cellar.

  • Price points vary, but you can get a good bottle around $15, and $30 is a splurge.
  • Pinks from Provence are the most popular and consistent.
  • Spanish Rosado tends to have bigger and bolder flavors than French rosés.
  • Rosato comes from Italy.
  • Don’t be suckered into gimmicky labels. If you want a classic rosé, look for a sophisticated, old-world look on the label.
  • Serve as cold as possible.

Wine writer Katherine Cole shares some great pairings in ‘The Rules of Rosé’ on domino.com, as does vinepair.com’s ‘The 25 Best Rosés You Need to Drink This Summer – 2017.’

Pretty in Pink: Food Pairings

Source: Palmdenver/ Instagram

Rosé wine falls right between a big red and a light white. They are so versatile and span a broad flavor spectrum that it’s likely there is a perfect pairing to whatever your meal involves.

  • Deeper-colored varieties of rosé wine pair well with burgers, pork, barbecue, chocolate, and other rich and hearty foods.
  • Pale rosés pair delightfully with cheese, salads, fish (sushi), chicken, and veggies.
  • Fizzy pink wines work well with saltier foods, vegetarian and vegan dishes, breakfast, and brunch.
  • Every shade of pink goes with pizza.

The #Brosé Movement

Source: Palmdenver/ Instagram

It’s not just women blushing over rosé.

Groups of metro-millennial men have been embracing the rosé movement since 2015, and have no shame in drinking the pink.

Are you a rosé wine drinker? If so, do tell…

Anne-Marie Pritchett is a freelance writer for Scott's Marketplace who enjoys exploring the outdoors, visiting different cultures, digging into new music, and cuddling her new baby. When she gets some free time, she likes to check out local gastropubs and attempt to speak in her British accent.

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